Loving Church Even When It’s Boring

Screen Shot 2014-02-06 at 10.51.35 PMI’m only vaguely familiar with Donald Miller, so it feels awkward to dive into the recent controversy surrounding him. Miller is the author of Blue Like Jazz, which was a mini-sensation in evangelical circles a few years ago. All II knew about the book was that Christian teens loved it and youth pastors spent a lot of time condemning or praising it.

The firestorm began when Miller confessed that he had no interest in attending church. Initially I was shocked that a bestselling evangelical author would risk his writing career with such a scandalous confession, but Miller’s appeal resides in his willingness to dance on the edge of acceptable evangelical beliefs a la Rob Bell. But both of his posts dovetail nicely with my last post.

Last week I stated that my comfort level with a church is largely based on its ability to answer the question “Why are we here?” in a universal sense and an immediate “why are we here on thhs particular Sunday morning?” sense.

Miller approaches this from a more immediate angle: he doesn’t get much out of church, and for him it’s a design flaw rather than a problem with one particular style of worship.

I’ll confess that I share some of his frustrations. Personally I’d rather suffer through a Two and a Half Men marathon than listen to contemporary worship music. For me it’s not about the song choice or the quality of the performance; I just find  CCM mind-numbingly vapid, no matter how sincere or reverent its lyrics. I used to tell my Campus Crusader friends that I felt CCM never stops trying to sell its listeners on its sincerity (i.e. We’re really really joyful, and we can prove it if you listen to us sing the word joy forty seven times!)

So for me worship music was thirty minutes of service that I tuned out. I figured that this is the part of the service that other people loved, and I had no business pissing on their joy or tapping into my inner hipster and looking down on their musical tastes. As I see it, there is no worship music that truly moves me, so quibbling over the music seemed like wasted energy.

The irony was that, due to my lack of interest in CCM, I rarely heard the original versions of the songs my church sang. Inevitably I discovered that the rag-tag sing alongs evangelical churches sang every Sunday turned out to be horrifically overproduced dreck, and if anything, the congregations’ lo-fi versions were better than the originals.

All of this is a roundabout way to say that I share many of Miller’s frustrations, and i’m not sure how church – particularly the contemporary worship format-  can be done differently. However, I also don’t expect my needs to take center stage when I worship.

I love going to church (even though I don’t currently have one I’m attending), even when I’ve hit a dry spot where the sermons or Sunday School classes leave me wanting. I look at church the way people look at school: the more you invest in it, offer your services, and connect with people, the more rewarding it will be. Except church has the added bonus of serving and worshipping God, and no matter how rewarding work is, it can’t compare to worshipping with fellow believes. As Jonathan Leeman so adeptly puts it:

“I don’t know how we can say we love and belong to the church without loving and belonging to a church. Or saying we want to connect with God, but we won’t listen to God’s Word for only 45 minutes out of all the minutes in a week. Ultimately, it’s like claiming we’re righteous in Christ, but not bothering to “put on” that righteousness with how we live.”

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